Vetkoek

Tags

, , , ,

 

Image result for vetkoek

Vetkoek  is a traditional South African fried dough bread common in Afrikaner cookery. It is either served filled with cooked mince (ground beef) or with syrup, honey, or jam. It is thought to have its origins from the Dutch oliebollen, which date from the time of the migration period. The word “vetkoek” literally means “fat cake” in Afrikaans or “fat cookie” in Dutch. It is similar in shape to a doughnut without a hole, and is made from flour, salt and yeast. Dough is rolled into a ball then deep fried. In a traditional South African braai, or barbecue, vetkoek may be served alongside boerewors.

Similar to a vetkoek, the amagwinya is a popular meal for many people living in townships. The term amagwinya originates from the historically Black townships of Gauteng in South Africa. Amagwinya differ from the vetkoek in that amagwinya are never filled like the traditional vetkoek; but are served plain and hot with an optional variety of piquant, umami and salty side dishes such as portions of Cape snoek fish, mango atchar, sausage and salted fried potato chips. The popularity of this food item is evidenced by the many spaza shops, hawkers at taxi ranks, roadside vendors, and fast food shops in the  townships who sell this food.

Traditional vetkoek is made from yeast, but this quick and easy vetkoek recipe uses cake flour and baking powder as the raising agent.

Makes 12

Ingredients:

140 g / 1 1/4 cups cake flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
Pinch of salt
1 egg, well beaten
125 ml / 1/2 cup milk
Oil for frying

Preparation:

Sift the dry ingredients together
Add the egg and mix well
Pour in the milk and mix to make a batter
Heat the oil
Drop the batter by spoonful into the hot oil and brown on all sides
Serve with butter and honey or cut open and fill with curried mince
Enjoy!

Save

Quiche with artichokes, feta and mushrooms

Tags

, , , , , ,

img_2716

As most of my regular followers know by now, I love a good quiche or savoury tart. So, I am always experimenting with different flavour combinations. Sometimes, it is simply because I open the fridge and pull out all that needs to be eaten then try and come up with dishes to use them in. Pasta is always an easy option but it can be heavy and I am desperately trying to lose a few pounds that crept on during the holidays, so salads and tarts are a good option. Although I usually cannot stop at just one piece of quiche – but then, who can? This was one of those times that I had mushrooms that needed eating, feta, eggs, cream, spicy olives, an open jar of artichokes – all the ingredients needed. The result was absolutely delicious, a very Mediterranean tasting quiche that was perfect on a gloomy, cold, day to take me away to Greece, Cyprus, Sicily or somewhere similar.

Serves 4
Ingredients:

1 pâte brisée / shortcrust pastry
200g / 8oz mixed mushrooms (button, crema, chanterelles, morilles)
3 eggs
100g / 1/3 cup thick greek yoghurt
100g / 4oz feta, crumbled or cut into pieces
200ml / 3/4 cup thick cream
200g / 8oz marinated artichokes (from a jar)
2 tablespoons olives, pitted and cut into pieces
1 tablespoon Herbs de Provence
Pinch of curry powder
Olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Preparation:

Preheat the oven to 180C / 360F
Place the pastry in a quiche or tart pan and set aside
Drain the artichokes and cut into pieces
Clean and cut the mushrooms into small pieces
Heat about 1/2 tablespoon oil in a sauté pan and cook the mushrooms for a few minutes
Whisk the eggs with the cream and the greek yoghurt
Add the curry powder and salt and pepper
Arrange the artichokes, the olives and the mushrooms evenly on the pastry base
Pour the cream and egg mixture gently over
Sprinkle on the crumbled feta pieces
Sprinkle the herbs evenly over the top
Bake for about 40 minutes
Enjoy!

Save

Endive, Roquefort and walnut salad

Tags

, , , , ,

img_2742img_2743

I think that this must be one of my favourite winter salads, it’s so delicate, and has such a wonderful, just lightly bitter flavor, I just can’t resist.The crunchy endive with fresh walnuts, creamy yet strong tasting Roquefort all dressed in a fragrant walnut oil – yum! This is a classic bistro salad if ever there was one. Usually served as a starter or even a main course but it is not a side salad. Make sure you have a soft and creamy Roquefort and not a dry and crumbly one. Due to the cheese being salty, I do not add salt to this salad. I also was lucky enough to use walnuts from our trees that we harvested in October (we still have heaps).  Feel free to toast them if you wish but I used them fresh.

Serves 6

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
Freshly ground black pepper
Belgian endives, about 6
1 cup / 120g organic walnut halves
180g / 6oz Roquefort, crumbled
4 tablespoons / 60ml walnut oil

Preparation:

Wash and dry the endives, remove 2cm / 1″ from the stem end of each endive, discard the core, and cut the rest across into 2cm /1″ chunks (do not use the very bottom hard bits)
Place the leaves in a large salad bowl
Add the walnuts and the crumbled Roquefort
Combine the lemon juice with the oil and pepper and whisk to blend
Drizzle the dressing over the salad and toss
Serve immediately
Bon Appétit!

Save